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Folk Farmsteads On The Frontier


Susan Smith
 

This might be of interest

Live Virtual Lecture - Free and open to the public, but registration is required

“Folk Farmsteads On The Frontier” Thursday, January 28 @ 6:00 PM - 7:00 PM

 

Folk Farmsteads on the Frontier: German-American Farm Buildings in Southwestern North Dakota

This talk focuses on farm buildings built by German-Americans who immigrated from Russia, Hungary, and other parts of eastern Europe during the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries in Stark and Hettinger Counties in southwestern North Dakota

Max Kade Institute For German-American Studies

https://mki.wisc.edu/event/live-virtual-lecture-folk-farmsteads-on-the-frontier/


George Bockius
 

Thank you!!!


-----Original Message-----
From: Susan Smith <rjsmiths@...>
To: everybody@banat.groups.io
Sent: Mon, Jan 11, 2021 6:40 pm
Subject: [banat] Folk Farmsteads On The Frontier

This might be of interest

Live Virtual Lecture - Free and open to the public, but registration is required
“Folk Farmsteads On The Frontier” Thursday, January 28 @ 6:00 PM - 7:00 PM
 
Folk Farmsteads on the Frontier: German-American Farm Buildings in Southwestern North Dakota
This talk focuses on farm buildings built by German-Americans who immigrated from Russia, Hungary, and other parts of eastern Europe during the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries in Stark and Hettinger Counties in southwestern North Dakota

Max Kade Institute For German-American Studies
https://mki.wisc.edu/event/live-virtual-lecture-folk-farmsteads-on-the-frontier/


Dave Dreyer
 

The Max Kade Instute for German-American studies at the Univ of Wisconsin has, so far as I am aware, contributed minimally to Banat matters.  Having said this, a study of structures created by North Dakota Banat homesteaders is certainly in order.  
John Michels devoted a section of his work on North Dakota Banaters to homesteader's structures.(J M Michels "North Dakota Pioneers from the Banat" 1992).  John's work if well illustrated with homesteads in Stark and Hettinger Counties  Moreover, he has matched each of the his photos with the name of the original homesteader.  John's photos were undated but must be earlier than date of publication, 1992.  Many of these structures illustrated were or are in a derelict condition.  Likely 30 years later many doubtless have been bulldozed away as the initial 160 acres of the original homesteads
were consolidated as they were proven and the owners moved away.
Below are three photos we took in 2003.  This typical ND Banat homestead was unoccupied and located in a grove of Cottonwood trees located south of Richardton at a junction of two county roads..  My memory fails and I can no longer pinpoint the location on the map.  It is a typical long house adopted to ND conditions with the pair of windows located on the short end and without a Gang.  The ND structures lacked the typical Barque facade found on  houses in more prosperous Banat villages. This house was wood frame and had wood floors and stairs leading to the attic which apparently served, at least partly, as bedrooms for kids. 
In the first photo on the right hand side in the darken area is a large horse barn and indication of first things first with the Banaters. 
.   
Inline image
Inline image
Inline image
Perhaps there is a list subscriber in ND who will recognize this homestead and can confirm that it still exists and even who may have one lived there..

Dave Dreyer
.      


On Tuesday, January 12, 2021, 01:41:30 PM PST, George Bockius via groups.io <bockfly@...> wrote:


Thank you!!!


-----Original Message-----
From: Susan Smith <rjsmiths@...>
To: everybody@banat.groups.io
Sent: Mon, Jan 11, 2021 6:40 pm
Subject: [banat] Folk Farmsteads On The Frontier

This might be of interest

Live Virtual Lecture - Free and open to the public, but registration is required
“Folk Farmsteads On The Frontier” Thursday, January 28 @ 6:00 PM - 7:00 PM
 
Folk Farmsteads on the Frontier: German-American Farm Buildings in Southwestern North Dakota
This talk focuses on farm buildings built by German-Americans who immigrated from Russia, Hungary, and other parts of eastern Europe during the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries in Stark and Hettinger Counties in southwestern North Dakota

Max Kade Institute For German-American Studies
https://mki.wisc.edu/event/live-virtual-lecture-folk-farmsteads-on-the-frontier/


Steve Herold
 

Dave I’ve asked some who grew up south of Richardton whether he recognizes any of the farms 
Also the house on the website at Wisconsin university  https://mki.wisc.edu/event/live-virtual-lecture-folk-farmsteads-on-the-frontier/ Is the Karl Lampl (my mother uncle) homestead.  For those familiar with the area it is located on the enchanted highway.  The designer and builder of the steel sculptures has received some money from the state to restore the house...but is a slow process...state hasn’t made any recent contributions.
Attached are two earlier photos of the house 


Steve

Begin forwarded message:

From: Dave Dreyer <ddreyer@...>
Date: January 15, 2021 at 10:44:54 PM CST
To: everybody@banat.groups.io, David Dreyer <ddreyer@...>
Subject: Re: [banat] Folk Farmsteads On The Frontier
Reply-To: everybody@banat.groups.io


The Max Kade Instute for German-American studies at the Univ of Wisconsin has, so far as I am aware, contributed minimally to Banat matters.  Having said this, a study of structures created by North Dakota Banat homesteaders is certainly in order.  
John Michels devoted a section of his work on North Dakota Banaters to homesteader's structures.(J M Michels "North Dakota Pioneers from the Banat" 1992).  John's work if well illustrated with homesteads in Stark and Hettinger Counties  Moreover, he has matched each of the his photos with the name of the original homesteader.  John's photos were undated but must be earlier than date of publication, 1992.  Many of these structures illustrated were or are in a derelict condition.  Likely 30 years later many doubtless have been bulldozed away as the initial 160 acres of the original homesteads
were consolidated as they were proven and the owners moved away.
Below are three photos we took in 2003.  This typical ND Banat homestead was unoccupied and located in a grove of Cottonwood trees located south of Richardton at a junction of two county roads..  My memory fails and I can no longer pinpoint the location on the map.  It is a typical long house adopted to ND conditions with the pair of windows located on the short end and without a Gang.  The ND structures lacked the typical Barque facade found on  houses in more prosperous Banat villages. This house was wood frame and had wood floors and stairs leading to the attic which apparently served, at least partly, as bedrooms for kids. 
In the first photo on the right hand side in the darken area is a large horse barn and indication of first things first with the Banaters. 
.   
Inline image
Inline image
Inline image
Perhaps there is a list subscriber in ND who will recognize this homestead and can confirm that it still exists and even who may have one lived there..

Dave Dreyer
.      


On Tuesday, January 12, 2021, 01:41:30 PM PST, George Bockius via groups.io <bockfly@...> wrote:


Thank you!!!


-----Original Message-----
From: Susan Smith <rjsmiths@...>
To: everybody@banat.groups.io
Sent: Mon, Jan 11, 2021 6:40 pm
Subject: [banat] Folk Farmsteads On The Frontier

This might be of interest

Live Virtual Lecture - Free and open to the public, but registration is required
“Folk Farmsteads On The Frontier” Thursday, January 28 @ 6:00 PM - 7:00 PM
 
Folk Farmsteads on the Frontier: German-American Farm Buildings in Southwestern North Dakota
This talk focuses on farm buildings built by German-Americans who immigrated from Russia, Hungary, and other parts of eastern Europe during the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries in Stark and Hettinger Counties in southwestern North Dakota

Max Kade Institute For German-American Studies
https://mki.wisc.edu/event/live-virtual-lecture-folk-farmsteads-on-the-frontier/